Senate candidate makes his own history

It’s one thing to flip-flop on the issues.

But who’s ever heard of a candidate rewriting his own company history?

That’s exactly what U.S. Senate candidate Ron Johnson did last week.

For nearly nine years, his plastics company has carried this online description of its beginning:

“Founded in 1977, Pacur occupies a facility constructed specifically for sheet extrusion, which provides polyester and polypropylene sheet and rollstock to converters, distributors, and end users,” said the website for the Oshkosh-based factory.

But that changed on Wednesday.

Johnson’s firm tinkered with its website to move up Pacur’s first day of operation by a couple of years.

“Founded in 1979*, Pacur occupies a facility constructed specifically for sheet extrusion, which provides polyester and polypropylene sheet and rollstock to converters, distributors, and end users,” the site says now. The footnote points out that Pacur’s predecessor, Wisconsin Industrial Shipping Supplies, came into existence in ’77 before being renamed and restructured two years later.

Why the change?

Here’s one possibility: A Madison TV story said last week that Johnson’s plastics factory paid for construction of a railroad line years ago with the help of a federal grant – even though the candidate is a sharp critic of government help for private firms.

Johnson’s campaign responded by saying the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development made the grant in March 1979, months before Pacur was even founded.

“Ron Johnson moved to Wisconsin in June of 1979 and started Pacur, which has become a true Wisconsin success story,” Johnson’s campaign countered. “Nonetheless, these allegations from WKOW are based entirely on dubious premises.”

The only problem with Johnson’s timeline, however, was Pacur’s own website, which put its founding in 1977. It is not unusual for companies to adopt the corporate histories of their predecessors or firms they acquire, especially if it makes them look like they have deeper roots in a community. Wisconsin Industrial Shipping was owned by Johnson’s brother-in-law, Pat Curler.

But by Wednesday – voila! – Johnson’s company website had been brought in line with statements by Johnson’s campaign. (Source: JS Online)

Interesting occurence don’t you think? Go to the source and read the rest.

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2 thoughts on “Senate candidate makes his own history

  1. It is a nothingburger. The change was made to make it clear to even prewsstitutes, or at least those who don’t have a vested interest in saving Russ Feingold’s job, who can’t read a calendar that it was the previous ownership of what became Pacur that requested and received that subsidized rail line.

    Do consider the source; the official print press organ of the Democrat Party of Wisconsin.

  2. Sorry for the typos – I was doing it from my semi-“smart”phone. Now that I see that it was from the ex-Spice Boy who has demonstrated that vested interest in saving liberal Democrats by every means possible (no, not even any means necessary), I am more convinced than ever that it is a nothingburger.

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