“The Dangers of Satiety and Curiosity” – Luther

There can be danger when it comes to things like curiosity.

Factious spirits enjoy two great advantages with the rabble: the one is curiosity, the other, satiety. Those are two large gates through which the devil can pass with a wagon of hay, indeed, with all of hell, prompting them to say: “Oh, this man can preach about nothing but Baptism, the Ten Commandments, the Lord’s Prayer, and the Creed, with which even the children are conversant. What’s the idea, that he constantly harangues us with the same message? Who is not able to do that? After all, one must not always stick with the same thing, but develop and progress, etc.” That signifies satiety with and weariness of the message. Junker Curiosity joins himself to this and says: “Oh, we must also hear this fellow. He is a fine, learned, and pious man, etc.” Thus they lend a hand and humor this curiosity to hear whatever their ears itch to hear, saying: “Dear people, all this while you have been hearing the selfsame thing. You must progress beyond that and hear and examine not only one but also others.” And thus a person follows these people, lets himself be coaxed and wheedled, stands there gaping and staring and gives ear to all that is told him.

Martin Luther, Luther’s Works, Vol. 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy, ed. Jaroslav Jan Pelikan, Hilton C. Oswald and Helmut T. Lehmann, 1 Co 15:1–2 (Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1999).

Source: Daily Luther: The Dangers of Satiety and Curiosity | CyberBrethren – A Lutheran Blog.

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