Santorum “Certified Winner” in Iowa

The “split decision” in Iowa didn’t last long.  Rick Santorum has been certified the winner of the Iowa caucus.

, U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania.

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“In order to clarify conflicting reports and to affirm the results released January 18 by the Republican Party of Iowa, Chairman Matthew Strawn and the State Central Committee declared Senator Rick Santorum the winner of the 2012 Iowa Caucus,” the state GOP’s statement read.

The news is a blow to the campaign of Mitt Romney.

The news that Romney — who for two weeks celebrated what he jokingly called a ‘landslide’ eight-vote victory in Iowa, only to see it reversed this week when the state GOP certified Santorum the leader by 34 votes — officially lost the first contest muddies his narrative, especially as Newt Gingrich surges in the polls in South Carolina.

Basically instead of possibly going three for three in the early voting states, the candidate of the Republican establishment is on the verge of going one for three.  It also means that the race to become the Republican nominee for President is wide open.

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Iowa “split decision”

After the certification process of the votes in the Iowa caucus, it wasn’t a win for Mitt Romney.

Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum received 34 votes more than former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney in this month’s Iowa caucuses, state Republican officials reported Thursday.

The party officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, told the Des Moines Register that the final caucus count would remain unresolved because the results from eight precincts were mislaid and will never be certified. Any of those missing results could hold an advantage for Romney.

The totals reported just after the Jan. 3 ballots had given Romney a narrow, eight-vote win over Santorum. It gave an early boost to Romney’s bid for the Republican presidential nomination.

“It’s a split decision,” the executive director of the Iowa GOP Chad Olsen said.

How did the two candidates respond to the news.

“The results from Iowa caucus night revealed a virtual tie. I would like to thank the Iowa Republican Party for their careful attention to the caucus process, and we once again recognize Rick Santorum for his strong performance in the state,” Romney said. “The Iowa caucuses, with record turnout, were a great start to defeating President Obama in Iowa and elsewhere in the general election.”

Santorum previously told Fox News that he was unfazed by possible errors. “That doesn’t really matter to me. I mean, this was a tie,” Santorum said.

Does it have an impact on the belief that Romney is all but assured the Republican nomination?

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Birthright Citizenship Act has 61 co-sponsors

The legislation was introduced last month by Rep. Steve King of IowaIn recent days it gained four more co-sponsors.

The Fourteenth Amendment extends citizenship to all persons born in the U.S. and “subject to the jurisdiction”; it also grants Congress the power to enforce and define the provisions of the amendment.

Since the Civil Rights Act of 1866, Congress has defined Birthright Citizenship through appropriate legislation, which for decades has granted citizenship to newborns with both parents illegal aliens, foreign tourists or temporary foreign workers and students. The Fourteenth Amendment gives Congress the right to define birthright citizenship differently.

The Birthright Citizenship Act of 2011 would add to the existing federal code a provision that requires at least one parent of a new born to be a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident in order for the new born to receive automatic citizenship.

This legislation is sound and appropriate.  Wonder why new House members Reid Ribble (WI-08) and Sean Duffy (WI-08) haven’t signed on as co-sponsors.  For that matter why haven’t any members of the Wisconsin House delegation signed on?

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