Mainstream Media’s Hypocrisy

On full display when it comes to recall petitions in Wisconsin.

When a conservative media outlet brings up concerns:

Just as the recall petition circulating process was getting underway in November of last year, Media Trackers unearthed privacy concerns over the way information on a recall petition could be used. At the time, Media Trackers pointed out that recall petitions are different than other electoral documents such as voter registration forms and nominating papers, and because of that the information on them could be used against those who sign a petition.

The PolitiFact division of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel noted the report and chose to review it. They rated the conclusions “Mostly False,” even after agreeing with the substance of Media Trackers’ analysis of the facts and statements related to the issue.

Yet when a liberal group brings up the SAME concerns, there is silence.

Now, two months after the Media Trackers report and PolitiFact’s rating of it, the American Civil Liberties Union of Wisconsin is expressing concern over privacy issues and the recall process. In a story reported by TMJ4, WISN-TV, WKOW-TV and WXOW-TV, the ACLU is suggesting that steps need to be taken by the Government Accountability Board to keep the information of domestic abuse victims private even as other signatures are released.

While the Media Trackers report on these concerns earned negative coverage in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, now that a liberal group is echoing those same concerns, the newspaper and other critics of the report at the time are remaining silent.

Shocking the hypocrisy shown by the mainstream media outlets.  Just more proof the mainstream media is in the hip pocket of liberals.

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Why Cheer For Scott Walker

English: Scott Walker, 45th Governor of Wisconsin

Image via Wikipedia

A great columnpointing out why to cheer for Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is currently the target of a recall effort spearheaded by national public employee unions. If his opponents get enough signatures by Jan. 17, Wisconsin will hold a gubernatorial election this summer. The outcome is crucial to the future of the country.

Wisconsin has emerged as a central battleground in the fight over the outsized political role played by, and the enormous privileges enjoyed by, public employee unions. The collective bargaining entitlement enables public sector workers to extract excessive compensation, benefits, and pension packages at the expense of taxpayers.

In March, Walker signed what is now nationally famous legislation that reformed public employee collective bargaining. The bill was crucial to putting Wisconsin on a sustainable fiscal path. Public employee unions fought bitterly, albeit unsuccessfully, to block Walker’s reforms. Now they are trying to recall him.

And as those of us in Wisconsin have seen, the reforms ARE working.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, which opposed Walker’s collective bargaining reforms, recently noted, “The governor did balance the budget … he did reduce the structural deficit significantly; he did put a lid on property tax increases; he did give schools and municipalities more control over their budgets than they’ve had in years.”

What’s more, the reforms pushed by Walker are themselves already having a beneficial effect. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett was Walker’s opponent in the 2010 election and later attacked his proposals to reform collective bargaining. But with the reforms on the books, Barrett used some of the bill’s provisions to help reduce the city’s health care bill, saying that the alternative was to cut 300 to 400 city jobs.

The fact is these reforms in collective bargaining were needed and are needed in states across the country.  This is why:

Collective bargaining reform is also needed to enable genuine education reform. The collective bargaining privilege gives teacher unions political power that is used to block reform efforts and shield K-12 education from entrepreneurial disruptions that threaten established ways of doing things.

In a recent discussion, Walker told me that “collective bargaining in the public sector is not a right; it’s an expensive entitlement.” The struggle to rein in and reform expensive entitlements will define American politics for the next generation.

If you understand why the accomplishments of Governor Walker should be cheered, then you understand why the Left will stop at nothing in their attempt to recall him.  And that is why every effort to ensure another victory for Governor Walker needs to be employed by Conservatives.

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Report: Raiders To Hire Packers McKenzie As GM

Congratulations to Packers Director of Football Operations Reggie McKenzie.

The Oakland Raiders will hire Green Bay Packers director of football operations Reggie McKenzie as their next general manager, according to a league source.

The two sides have been engaged in talks over the past week and are still ironing the details of McKenzie’s role and his powers within the organization, the source said.

McKenzie has had the support of former Raiders executives Ron Wolf, Ken Herock and John Madden, who were assisting the team in its search for a new general manager.

“Reggie’s a tremendous evaluator,” Wolf told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel on Wednesday. “He can tell you who can play and who can’t play. That’s what it’s all about. Some can write reports but can’t tell you who can play. Whatever that is, he has that. He has a feel.”

McKenzie, who played linebacker for the Raiders from 1985-88, officially interviewed with the team Wednesday, a source told Schefter.

Owner Al Davis, who died in October, had effectively served as the team’s general manager until his death.

A well-deserved promotion that should have happen before now.  A big loss for the Green Bay Packers, but that is the price of being a successful team.

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Wisconsin Budget reform saves teachers’ jobs

This is the message that needs to be constantly put out to voters between now and August 9th.  Great piece.   (H/T – Jerry)

With “collective bargaining rights” limited to wages, Koczela was able to change the teachers’ benefits package to fill the budget gap. Requiring teachers to contribute 5.8 percent of their salary toward pensions saved $600,000. Changes to their health care plan​—​such as a $10 office visit co-pay (up from nothing)​—​saved $200,000. Upping the workload from five classes, a study hall, and two prep periods to six classes and two prep periods saved another $200,000. The budget was balanced.

“Everything we changed didn’t touch the children,” Koczela said. Under a collective bargaining agreement, she continued, “We could never have negotiated that​—​never ever.” Koczela, a graduate of Smith College and Duke University Law School, is no Republican flack. She says she’s a “classic Wisconsin independent. I vote both parties. I voted for Senator [Russ] Feingold but I voted for [Republican state] Senator Alberta Darling too.”

In Brown Deer and school districts across the state, Walker’s budget repair bill, known as Act 10, is working just as he promised. To make up for a $2.8 billion deficit without raising taxes, state aid to school districts (the largest budget line) was reduced by $830 million. Act 10, Walker said, would give districts “the tools” needed to make up for the lost money as fairly as possible.

But union leaders argued that the fight over the budget repair bill had nothing to do with balancing budgets. It was all about stripping public employees of their “collective bargaining rights.”

What few people may have understood, though, is that these are “rights” that most people, including federal employees, don’t have. But Americans don’t like taking away anybody’s rights. The polls in Wisconsin showed voters overwhelmingly opposed to “weakening” or “stripping” or “eliminating” collective bargaining rights. President Obama called the bill an “assault on unions.” Democratic state senator Lena Taylor compared Scott Walker to Hitler.

But as the abstract debate over collective bargaining collides with reality, it is becoming clear just how big a lie the Big Labor line was. Now that the law is in effect, where are the horror stories of massive layoffs and schools shutting down? They don’t exist​—​except in a couple of districts where collective bargaining agreements, inked before the budget repair bill was introduced, remain in effect.

Those districts would be Milwaukee (which also had layoffs last year) …

In Milwaukee, nine schools are shutting and 354 teachers have been fired due to a drop in state funding and the end of federal stimulus funding. But if teachers there agreed to the 5.8 percent pension contribution, the school district says it would rehire 200 of those teachers. (Other changes could offset the rest of the layoffs.)

and Kenosha.

The only other district seeing such massive layoffs is Kenosha, where 212 teachers will be fired this year. “Kenosha is in the same boat as [Milwaukee], with a collective bargaining agreement signed before Walker took office that lasts until June 30, 2013,” the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported on July 16. “But most other Wisconsin districts have avoided layoffs and massive cuts to programs.”

Across the state there is proof that Act 10 is was the right thing to do thanks to the flexibility it provides.

One striking feature of Walker’s budget repair bill is the flexibility it has given school districts to balance their budgets. For example, things are looking up in the tiny town of Pittsville in the heart of the state, where the district balanced its budget mostly through increased pension contributions and not replacing four retiring teachers.

“We didn’t change anything in our health care at all,” Superintendent Terry Reynolds told me. “If Act 10 hadn’t passed,” he said, “I don’t think the teachers’ union would have wanted to approve the 5.8 percent contribution” to pensions. “That would have been a hard battle to fight. I’m not sure we would have saved dollars there.” Enough money was freed up that Pittsville property taxes will decrease by 9 percent next year.

If you live in any of the State Senate District with a recall election on August 9th, make sure voters there understand their Senator did the right thing by voting “Yes” on Act 10 and should remain in office.

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