GOP President Probably Won’t Repeal ObamaCare

Mitt Romney’s opponents in the GOP Presidential primary need to jump all over this.  Seems one of his advisors feels ObamaCare won’t be repealed completely.

“You will not repeal the act in its entirety, but you will see major changes, particularly if there is a Republican president,” Coleman told BioCentury This Week television in an interview that aired on Sunday. “You can’t whole-cloth throw it out. But you can substantially change what’s been done.”

That would be former Minnesota Senator Norm Coleman, who Romney’s campaign is trying to distance itself from.

“With all due respect to Sen. Coleman, he’s wrong,” campaign spokeswoman Andrea Saul said via e-mail. “Gov. Romney can and will repeal Obamacare and is committed to doing so.”

Distancing or not this is another example of why Mitt Romney can NOT be the Republican nominee. It’s also an example of why the Republican establishment needs to stop trying to pick who their nominee should be.

(H/T – RedState)

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Kleefisch: “It’s Our Turn”

Wisconsin Lt. Governor Rebecca Kleefisch is spot on with this speech at a rally to support Governor Scott Walker this past weekend.

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A 2012 Republican Strategy for Congress

A great editorialearlier this month by Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson.

English: Official photo of Senator Ron Johnson...

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America’s Choice seeks to highlight the differences between the Republican Party and the Democratic Party led by President Obama. It could do so over the coming months by presenting to the country, through a series of votes in the House of Representatives, the battle between those who believe in broadest terms in limited government and freedom and those who promote government control and dependency.

What are the choices these votes could present? Growing government spending and debt or growing the private sector and reducing government. Limiting energy development or using America’s energy resources. Punishing success or pro-growth tax reform. A government takeover of health care or repealing ObamaCare and replacing it with patient-centered, free-market reforms.

The alternatives are stark. President Obama’s faith in government is so strong that he has increased its size to 24% of gross domestic product from 21%, and increased our nation’s debt by over $4 trillion. Republicans, on the other hand, believe long-term self-sustaining jobs are created in the private sector—that government cannot tax, spend and borrow our nation to prosperity.

As Senator Johnson points out, this strategy highlights the stark differences in vision with the Democrats and President Obama.

America’s Choice would clearly present two different visions of the country’s future—one represented by the Republican Party and the other represented by the Democratic Party and its leader, President Obama. Once Congress returns from recess later this month, the Republican majority in the House could focus on one major area of domestic policy at a time. For example, February could be used to debate, craft and pass an energy utilization policy.

When the House debates and passes an agenda item, Republican senators, candidates and conservative groups could concentrate on the same issue, using the same powerful facts and figures to inform and persuade the American public. Coordinating our focused efforts improves our ability to compete with the presidential bully pulpit and counteract media outlets that often work to marginalize us.

In 2011, President Obama stopped running the country and started running his re-election campaign. In his cynical attempt to divert attention away from his record by dividing us, Republicans have been put on defense. The America’s Choice agenda would put us on offense.

If done well, we just might put enough pressure on Senate Democrats and the president to actually pass legislation that will begin to solve our problems. If not, Republicans will have provided Americans with a clear choice in November.

And ultimately that is what Republicans need to do in the coming months, provide a clear choice to voters.  Especially since the prospects of President Obama working with Republicans are very slim.

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Republican Race Wide Open

After three contests with three different winners, it’s wide open in the race to choose a Republican nominee.

And in the process, the campaign of Newt Gingrich has gained new life.

Newt Gingrich resurrected his campaign Saturday with a stunning victory in the South Carolina Republican presidential primary, leveraging strong debate performances and a handful of wrong turns for Mitt Romney to surge past the former frontrunner and reset the race which is now headed for Florida.

After claiming his first primary win, the former House speaker rallied supporters on the road to the next contest on Jan. 31. Gingrich, looking to convey the image of a general election candidate, focused his victory speech almost entirely on President Obama, unloading some of his toughest criticism to date on the White House incumbent.

“He makes Jimmy Carter look strong,” Gingrich quipped at the close of his speech.

Gingrich faces organizational challenges going forward, but he said Saturday: “We don’t have the kind of money at least one of the candidates has, but we do have ideas and we do have people.”

Gingrich locked up a decisive victory in the state. With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Gingrich pulled in 41 percent of the vote, to Romney’s 27 percent.

Rick Santorum finished in third with 17 percent, followed by Ron Paul with 13 percent.

What a difference a week makes in the world of politics.

The leader board virtually ensures a drawn-out Republican race, a turnaround from just a week ago when Romney seemed poised to clinch the nomination in short order.

Romney, at his post-election rally in South Carolina, acknowledged that he sees a “long primary season” ahead and vowed to put up a stiff fight.

“I’ll keep fighting for every single vote. I will compete in every single state,” Romney said.

Gingrich surged to win South Carolina after what was arguably the most eventful week of the primary season. Rick Perry dropped out of the race Thursday, throwing his support behind Gingrich. The Iowa Republican Party dropped the surprise announcement that Santorum, and not Romney, had actually won the Iowa caucuses. And Romney found himself repeatedly struggling to answer questions — pushed by the Gingrich campaign and echoed in the media — about why he’s not releasing his tax returns before April. Meanwhile, Gingrich was able to deflect questions about allegations from his second wife that he once sought an “open marriage.”

His scorching answer at Thursday’s debate to a question on the subject may have even helped improve his standing ahead of the South Carolina vote.

While the Republican establishment may have wanted things to be wrapped up by now, tonight’s results are great for the American people who should be the one’s choosing the Republican nominee.

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