Feingold not running for office in 2012

This is a devastating blow for the liberal left in Wisconsin going into 2012.

Former U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold announced this morning he will not be a candidate in 2012, telling supporters he will instead focus on teaching, writing a book and leading his Progressives United PAC.

Feingold was the favored candidate of some Dems to seek the party’s nomination next year either for the open U.S. Senate seat or to challenge Scott Walker if the guv is recalled. He also acknowledged in an email to his Progressives United supporters of his strong standings in the polls for both races.

“After twenty-eight continuous years as an elected official, however, I have found the past eight months to be an opportunity to look at things from a different perspective,” Feingold wrote.

In his concession speech on Election Night 2010, Feingold declared it “was on to 2012,” prompting speculation he may challenge President Obama in a Dem primary, a notion he quickly sought to tamp down.

In the email, he said he meant those words and said they were a reference to the need to re-elect Obama, pledging to work toward that goal. He said those words also now mean retaking Wisconsin government after the “aggressive tactics of Governor Walker and the legislature,” and pledged to use his Progressives United PAC to fight against those in the political process willing to accept unlimited corporate contributions for “short-term political gain.”

Still, he also called the last few months with family, friends and loved ones “among the best in my life, and I am not eager to give that up.”

“But for now I am thoroughly enjoying the life of a private citizen in this great state of Wisconsin,” he wrote.

In other words he doesn’t want to potentially be a “junior” Senator again and he sees that a recall of Governor Scott Walker has no real chance of success.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Share

Advertisements

Penny Pincher

Another hard-hitting ad by Ron Johnson.  This time revealing the facts by highlighting just how the national deficit and the national debt have skyrocketed since Senator Russ Feingold went to Washington in 1992.

Powered by ScribeFire.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Share

Jim DeMint: The Fired Congress

Some companies have a policy that once someone is fired, they aren’t allowed back on the premises out of fear they might do further damage to the company. It’s too bad Congress doesn’t have the same policy. Because before they’re replaced in January, all of the Democrats who are put out of a job in November will be able to come back and rob the nation blind.

More than a dozen senators will come back to Washington and decide how much more tax money to take from Americans, without being accountable to any of them. Higher taxes, cap-and-trade, amnesty, and card check will be top-priority items for the Fired Congress, otherwise known as the lame-duck Congress. They’re also likely to roll unfinished appropriations bills into a massive, pork-stuffed omnibus to snag every last possible earmark on their way out of Washington.

This must not happen. The only acceptable outcome of the lame-duck session is a continuing resolution to keep government operating at current levels of spending and taxation, as I pushed the Senate to do in 2006 after Republicans lost the majority to the Democrats. No last-minute earmarks, no add-ons, no tax increases, and no big deficit spending. (Source: National Review Online)

Considering the Democrats are about to get their hindside handed to them in three weeks, voters need to be vigilant.  As Senator DeMint points out in the rest of his article there is a lot of damage the Democrats could do if not held in check.

Will Congressman Steve Kagen and Senator Russ Feingold go on record promising not to support any attempts to cram spending and taxes through a lameduck session?  It’s important for voters to press them on this since they very well could be unaccountable to the voters after November 2nd.

Powered by ScribeFire.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Share

U.S. debt more than all the money in the world

Just a reminder: We are in trouble.

I have argued that the real national debt is about $130 trillion. Let’s say I’m being pessimistic. Forbes, in a 2008 article, came up with a lower number: $70 trillion. Let’s say the sunny optimists at Forbes got it right and I got it wrong.

For perspective: At the time that 2008 article was written, the entire supply of money in the world (“broad money,” i.e., global M3, meaning cash, consumer-account deposits, checkable accounts, CDs, long-term deposits, travelers’ checks, money-market funds, the whole enchilada) was estimated to be just under $60 trillion. Which is to say: The optimistic view is that our outstanding obligations amount to more than all of the money in the world.

Global GDP in 2008? Also about $60 trillion. Meaning that the optimistic view is that our federal obligations outpace the entire annual economic output of human civilization. (Source: National Review Online)

Voters be sure you Remember this on November 2.  Remember Congressman Steve Kagen & Senator Russ Feingold are part of the reason why “We are in trouble” financially.

Powered by ScribeFire.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Share