Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Michael

1st Battalion, 9th Marines1st Battalion, 9th Marines
U.S. Marines
This weeks post is a little different. Rather than an individual service member, or a group, Wednesday Hero is profiling an entire battalion. 1st Battalion, 9th Marines (1/9) aka “The Walking Dead”. Activated on March 1, 1942, 1/9 has had a long and distinguished service history. Seeing deployments in WWII, Vietnam, Somalia and Iraq. During the Vietnam War they earned the nickname “The Walking Dead” because of their extremely high casualty rate. 1/9 was deactivated in September 1994 but were once again called back into service in 2005. There has also been four Medal Of Honor recipients from 1/9; Pfc. Frank Witek, 2nd Lt. John Leims, Sgt. Walter Singleton & Cpt. Wesley Fox.

You can read more about 1st Battalion, 9th Marines here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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This Weeks Post Was Inspired By Sgt. Epler

Sgt. Ed Eaton

Sgt. Ed Eaton
From Tillamook, Oregon
U.S. Marines

While many view snipers as the hidden (safe) threats in war based on their forays in First Person Shooter video games and movies like “Saving Private Ryan” and “Enemy at The Gates“. The fact of the matter is that snipers, like any other soldiers in war, are very successible to danger – especially in the case of Sergeant Ed Eaton’s brave protection and rescue of comrade in arms Major Mike Perkins when he had fallen injured in a night assault during the Vietnam war 1969.

You can read more about Sgt. Eaton here. A quick caveat though. In doing research for this post this is the best site I could find for information on Sgt. Eaton. It’s not a site that I would normally link to for Wednesday Hero, but, like I said, it has the best information. There’s nothing really bad on it, but it may have some posts that some may not like.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.

We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

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LZ Lambeau funding decision delayed again

Official seal of Green Bay, Wisconsin
Image via Wikipedia

What is it with the Green Bay city council and making decisions?  Is it really that difficult?

Public funding for LZ Lambeau stalled again Tuesday when Green Bay aldermen disagreed on the proper level of city taxpayer support for the Vietnam War veteran tribute.

One alderman pushed for a contribution of nearly $25,000, representing half of the city’s costs for police protection and other services during the event.

But another argued for donating just $10,000 as part of a potential deal that could also include contributions from Brown County and an unnamed third party.

In the end, the City Council referred the matter back to committee for more deliberation, meaning that a final decision is unlikely until the council meets next on Aug. 17.

Seriously you’ve had since you deferred the decision in June, you had to delay it AGAIN!

It is the same action aldermen took in June when first confronted with the emotional issue of whether to use tax dollars to help LZ Lambeau organizers close a financial deficit. The City Council Finance Committee later voted 2-2 on making a contribution.

Alderwoman Amy Kocha proposed the $24,458 donation Tuesday and urged her colleagues not to delay a decision again while event organizers are trying to complete their fundraising.

“This just is not fair to these people,” Kocha said. (Source: Green Bay Press Gazette)

Even if the decision is no that is better than not making a decision and leaving people in limbo.  What has the city council in Green Bay acquired Brett Favre syndrome?

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This Post Was Suggested By Mark Bell.

Capt. Ed W. Freeman

Capt. Ed W. Freeman
November 20, 1927 – August 20, 2008
U.S. Army

For The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Captain Ed W. Freeman, United States Army, for numerous acts of conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary intrepidity on 14 November 1965 while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), action against enemy aggressor forces at LZ X-Ray, Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam, on 14 November 1965 As a flight leader and second in command of a 16-helicopter lift unit, he supported a heavily engaged American infantry battalion at Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley, Republic of Vietnam. The infantry unit was almost out of ammunition after taking some of the heaviest casualties of the war, fighting off a relentless attack from a highly motivated, heavily armed enemy force. When the infantry commander closed the helicopter landing zone due to intense direct enemy fire, Captain Freeman risked his own life by flying his unarmed helicopter through a gauntlet of enemy fire time after time, delivering critically needed ammunition, water, and medical supplies to the besieged battalion. His flights had a direct impact on the battle’s outcome by providing the engaged units with timely supplies of ammunition critical to their survival, without which they would almost surely have experienced a much greater loss of life. After medical evacuation helicopters refused to fly into the area due to intense enemy fire, Captain Freeman flew 14 separate rescue missions, providing life-saving evacuation of an estimated 30 seriously wounded soldiers — some of whom would not have survived had he not acted. All flights were made into a small emergency landing zone within 100 to 200 meters of the defensive perimeter where heavily committed units were perilously holding off the attacking elements. Captain Freeman’s selfless acts of great valor, extraordinary perseverance, and intrepidity were far above and beyond the call of duty or mission and set a superb example of leadership and courage for all of his peers. Captain Freeman’s extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

In 2002, Capt. Ed “Too Tall” Freeman was portrayed by actor Mark McCraken in the movie “We Were Soldiers”. Capt. Freeman passed away in 2008 due to complications of Parkinson’s.

Here is a great article on Capt. Freeman and his award ceremony.

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives so that others may enjoy the freedoms we get to enjoy everyday. For that, I am proud to call them Hero.
We Should Not Only Mourn These Men And Women Who Died, We Should Also Thank God That Such People Lived

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go < a href=”http://rightwingrightminded.blogspot.com/2006/08/wednesday-hero-blogroll.html”>here.
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