Wednesday Hero

This Weeks Post Was Suggested By Michael

1st Battalion, 9th Marines1st Battalion, 9th Marines
U.S. Marines
This weeks post is a little different. Rather than an individual service member, or a group, Wednesday Hero is profiling an entire battalion. 1st Battalion, 9th Marines (1/9) aka “The Walking Dead”. Activated on March 1, 1942, 1/9 has had a long and distinguished service history. Seeing deployments in WWII, Vietnam, Somalia and Iraq. During the Vietnam War they earned the nickname “The Walking Dead” because of their extremely high casualty rate. 1/9 was deactivated in September 1994 but were once again called back into service in 2005. There has also been four Medal Of Honor recipients from 1/9; Pfc. Frank Witek, 2nd Lt. John Leims, Sgt. Walter Singleton & Cpt. Wesley Fox.

You can read more about 1st Battalion, 9th Marines here and here

These brave men and women sacrifice so much in their lives just so others may get to enjoy freedom. For that I am proud to call them Hero.

Those Who Say That We’re In A Time When There Are No Heroes, They Just Don’t Know Where To Look

This post is part of the Wednesday Hero Blogroll. For more information about Wednesday Hero, or if you would like to post it on your site, you can go here.

Wednesday Hero Logo

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

$1.44 million

That’s how much federal money has been spent since 2008 studying male prostitutes in Vietnam.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has so far awarded $1.44 million in federal funds to a project that, among other things, is estimating the size of the population and examining the “social milieu” of male prostitutes in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

“In Study 1, formative ethnography will be used to describe the settings, venues, and overall social milieu in which male sex work is being situated,” says the NIH abstract for the grant. “In Study 2, we will conduct a Capture-Recapture Survey to estimate the size of the male sex worker population in each city.”

The grant project began in July 2008 and is scheduled to run through March 2012. In fiscal year 2008, the NIH awarded the project $534,201 in federal funds. In fiscal year 2009, the NIH awarded the project $465,974; and in fiscal year 2010, the NIH awarded the project $442,340.  So far, a total of $1,442,515 in federal funds have been awarded to the project. (Source: CNSNews)

Your federal tax dollars at work.  Is this a good way to be spending our money? Wonder if Steve Kagen voted for this.

Powered by ScribeFire.

Enhanced by Zemanta